Archive for the ‘Waterfalls’ Category

Ice and Water

December 1, 2020

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One of the advantages of visiting waterfalls in December is that we can often see water in a couple of different forms. This picture of ice and water was taken a few years back at Dry Falls in the Cullasaja Gorge of North Carolina.

Unaka Mountain Waterfall

November 17, 2020

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Late autumn can be a great time to go searching for waterfalls — the weather is usually mild and there are fewer people on the roads and trails than is the case during spring and summer.

Several years ago we explored the Unaka Mountain area near Erwin, Tennessee, on Thanksgiving weekend. Being on the mountain was certainly much more enjoyable than facing Black Friday crowds at the stores and malls. We drove along some Forest Service roads and did some hiking. This pretty little waterfall is one of the sights we enjoyed.

Blackwater Falls

September 29, 2020

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Betsy and I celebrated by birthday earlier this year before the pandemic and the lockdowns came along and closed everything down. We went to Blackwater Falls State Park in West Virginia for a short getaway with the possibility of getting in some hiking.

Blackwater Falls is a pretty waterfall that gets its name from the amber tint of the water going over the falls. The tint comes from the tannic acid of fallen hemlock and red spruce needles.

This picture was taken at an overlook across the river from the main Blackwater Falls overlook near the base of the falls.

The Waterfalls of Fall Creek Falls

October 1, 2019

Cane Creek Falls, Fall Creek Falls State Park, Tennessee. April 21, 2013.

If you have kept up with Betsy and me for any length of time, you know that Fall Creek Falls State Park here in Tennessee is a special place for us. It was the place for our first ‘big’ date, our first kiss, and the beginnings of our fascination with waterfalls.

I know I have posted pictures of the individual waterfalls in the park, but I don’t think I’ve done a single post that shows all the waterfalls The pictures in this post were taken over several years — we’ve visited Fall Creek Falls at least once a year since 2001. I’m showing the waterfalls in the order we usually visit them while at the park.

The waterfall above is Cane Creek Falls. The overlook for this waterfall is the first we come to after entering the park.

Rockhouse Falls, Fall Creek Falls State Park, Tennessee. April 22, 2019

Rockhouse Falls shares the same basin with Cane Creek Falls. Rockhouse Falls is much taller, but it is on a smaller creek and has a lower flow of water.

Cane Creek Cascades, Fall Creek Falls State Park, Tennessee. April 21, 2013.

Cane Creek Cascade is a short distance upstream from Cane Creek Falls. In many ways the cascade is more impressive than the falls since it’s possible to get closer to it. Cane Creek Cascade is a great place to sit, relax and enjoy the beauty and the sound of water.

TributaryFalls, Fall Creek Falls State Park, Tennessee. April 21, 2018.

We discovered this little waterfall last year when the park was undergoing some renovations and a new, temporary, trail to Cane Creek Cascade was cut through the woods. I have not been able to find an official name for this waterfall nor have I found the name of the little creek that feeds it. So we refer to it as Tributary Falls.

George Hole Falls, Fall Creek Falls State Park, Tennessee. April 21, 2013.

I’ll admit that we’re cheating a little here. George Hole Falls is created by a small dam on Cane Creek. But we always visit this waterfall because George Hole is the site of our first kiss. We always try each year to recreate that kiss as well!

Fall Creek Falls, Fall Creek Falls State Park, Tennessee. September 6, 2015.

The park gets its name from Fall Creek Falls, which is the biggest waterfall in the park. This picture was taken from the overlook, and although we have hiked to the base of the falls, the hike back up seems to get a little longer and a little steeper each year. So we are mostly content to admire the waterfall from the overlook.

Coon Creek Falls, Fall Creek Falls State Park, Tennessee. April 21, 2013

Coon Creek Falls is a smaller waterfall on a stream that shares the same basin as Fall Creek Falls. Both waterfalls can be seen from the same overlook.

Piney Falls, Fall Creek Falls State Park, Tennessee. April 21, 2011.

The last waterfall we see on our visits to the park is Piney Falls. We have to admire this waterfall from an overlook some distance away, as it would involve a hike and overnight campouts to reach the falls. So we make do with telephoto lenses for our cameras and the view from the overlook.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this quick tour of Fall Creek Falls State Park. If you have the opportunity to visit the park in person, we’re sure you will enjoy it.

Desoto Falls

May 1, 2018

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Betsy and I have been to Desoto State Park in Alabama several times. It’s a wonderful park with waterfalls, hiking trails and a beautiful mountain setting. One of the main attractions of the park is Desoto Falls. All of these pictures are from a visit we made to the falls in 2013. This was part of a birthday surprise that Betsy had arranged for me.

There is a dam just above Desoto Falls which forms Desoto State Park Lake. Although the dam is not part of the waterfall, it too, is a beautiful sight.

The official viewing area for Desoto Falls offers only a side view of the waterfall. It’s a nice view, but Betsy and I had seen pictures of the waterfall from a different vantage point and we wanted to find it.

After talking to one of the park rangers we were told that it was possible to bushwhack to a view of the falls by following a primitive trail almost two miles from the official viewing area. We found the trailhead without too much difficulty and hiked back toward the waterfall.

After a while we were rewarded with this view of Desoto Falls. We weren’t as close we were at the official viewing area, but we both liked the view we were able to enjoy.

In some ways we hope that the primitive trail is not upgraded — we can keep this beautiful spot as our very own secret.

Another Experiment

July 5, 2016

DryFalls16062401

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I’ve been experimenting again.  I’ve used Photoshop to horizontally stitch together pictures to make panoramas, but I had never tried to stitch pictures vertically.

When Betsy and I visited Dry Falls on our way home from our anniversary celebration, I captured three pictures of different parts of the the waterfall which I later stitched together to get the image above.  I think the result gives a good view of Dry Falls.

Brush Creek Falls

April 3, 2013
Brush Creek Falls, Pipestem Resort State Park, West Virginia.  April 23, 2010.

Brush Creek Falls, Pipestem Resort State Park, West Virginia. April 23, 2010.

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As most of you know, Betsy and I enjoy tracking down and visiting waterfalls.  They don’t have to be big or well-known for us to enjoy them.  We visited Brush Creek Falls in April of 2010.  It is located in the Pipestem Resort State Park in West Virginia, but it required some hiking to get to it.

Mill Creek

March 27, 2013
The Shoals of Mill Creek, Cohutta Wilderness, Georgia.  March 8, 2011.

The Shoals of Mill Creek, Cohutta Wilderness, Georgia. March 8, 2011.

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It should come as no surprise that Betsy and I have favorite places we have visited several times.  Ocean Isle Beach in North Carolina is one, and Mt. Nebo in Arkansas is another.

But there are other places we have returned to as well.  One place a little closer is Mill Creek in the Cohutta Wilderness of northern Georgia.  We came across Mill Creek almost by accident the first time we were there, but there was a short hike from a campground along the creek to what is called the Shoals of Mill Creek.  There are several places along the creek where we could sit and enjoy the beauty and the sound of rushing water.

It takes a fairly long drive along a gravel Forest Service road to get to Mill Creek, but we both definitely think the drive is worth it.

The photo above, from my archives, was taken during a visit to Mill Creek in March, 2011.

Little Missouri Falls

March 20, 2013
Little Missouri Falls, Langley, Arkansas.  February 22, 2010.

Little Missouri Falls, Langley, Arkansas. February 22, 2010.

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Betsy and I don’t always agree with the writers of the books we use to find waterfalls.  We haven’t been disappointed as much as we’ve been surprised.

We read about Little Missouri Falls in one of our books on Arkansas waterfalls.  The description in the book talked about a waterfall on the Little Missouri River with multiple drops in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas.  Since we were getting pretty good at navigating Forest Service roads, we decided we would check it out.

We found Little Missouri Falls (above), but we both thought it was more of a cascade than a falls.

Little Missouri Falls, Langley, Arkansas.  February 22, 2010.

Little Missouri Falls, Langley, Arkansas. February 22, 2010.

Don’t get me wrong — it was very pretty, especially as the water rushed over the rocks.

Little Missouri River, Langley, Arkansas.  February 22, 2010.

Little Missouri River, Langley, Arkansas. February 22, 2010.

A nice bonus was the color of the Little Missouri River below the falls.

Falling Water Falls

February 20, 2013
Falling Water Falls, Ozark National Forest, Arkansas.  February 14, 2013

Falling Water Falls, Ozark National Forest, Arkansas. February 14, 2013

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Betsy and I drove into the Ozark National Forest of Arkansas on a gravel Forest Service road to visit Falling Water Falls o Valentine Day.  We had visited this waterfall a couple of times before, but we found much more water in the creek this time.  Also, the color of the water was absolutely gorgeous.